Friedman: Obama victory final end to Civil War

Where I live, the Civil War is sometimes frequently referred to as the “late great unpleasantness.” In the New York Times this morning, Thomas Friedman argues that the Civil War could not have truly ended until the election of Barack Obama, or someone like him:

And so it came to pass that on Nov. 4, 2008, shortly after 11 p.m. Eastern time, the American Civil War ended, as a black man — Barack Hussein Obama — won enough electoral votes to become president of the United States.

A civil war that, in many ways, began at Bull Run, Virginia, on July 21, 1861, ended 147 years later via a ballot box in the very same state. For nothing more symbolically illustrated the final chapter of America’s Civil War than the fact that the Commonwealth of Virginia — the state that once exalted slavery and whose secession from the Union in 1861 gave the Confederacy both strategic weight and its commanding general — voted Democratic, thus assuring that Barack Obama would become the 44th president of the United States.

This moment was necessary, for despite a century of civil rights legislation, judicial interventions and social activism — despite Brown v. Board of Education, Martin Luther King’s I-have-a-dream crusade and the 1964 Civil Rights Act — the Civil War could never truly be said to have ended until America’s white majority actually elected an African-American as president.

Yes we did.

1 Comment

Filed under Barack Obama, Racism, Victory

One response to “Friedman: Obama victory final end to Civil War

  1. Pingback: After Friedman, TWiB « AshPolitics

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